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Mervyn O’Driscoll

Mervyn O’Driscoll

Dr Mervyn O’Driscoll is the programme coordinator for the MA in History and he is also responsible for the European and International and Modern Ireland streams. Mervyn has published on Irish foreign policy, European integration history, nuclear history and Cold War Anglo-French-American relations.   He has lectured throughout Ireland, the UK, Europe, China and the US. His various works cover the following fields: Irish foreign policy, Irish neutrality, British diplomacy, nuclear history and Irish-European relations.  He currently serves as Vice-Chair of the Royal Irish Academy’s Standing Committee for International Affairs and on the advisory committee for the Dictionary of Irish Biography.  His interests include Irish diplomacy and foreign relations (neutrality, relations with Europe including the EC/EU) , international history, independent Ireland (politics, anti-Semitism, minorities, modernisation), 20th century Britain, post-war France, modern Germany, military history and nuclear history.

Email: mervyn.odriscoll@ucc.ie

David Ryan

David Ryan

Professor David Ryan is responsible for the Public History strand of the MA. David has published extensively on contemporary history and US foreign policy concentrating on the US interventions in the post-Vietnam era, including Central America, Angola, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and the broader Middle East amongst other places.  Professor Ryan maintains an active engagement with a variety of professional associations and has acted as Vice-Chair of the Transatlantic Studies Association with membership from throughout Europe, the Americas and Australia.  He serves as Senior Associate Editor of the Association’s The Journal of Transatlantic Studies published by Routledge.   David also headed a major research project on War and American Identity.

Email: david.ryan@ucc.ie

Donal O’Drisceoil

Donal O’Drisceoil

Dr Donal O’Drisceoil contributes to the media stream of the programme.   Donal has published extensively on both Irish labour history and on the history of modern Irish media and literary censorship.  He has also published widely on the history of Cork, co-authoring acclaimed volumes on the English Market, Murphy’s Brewery, Beamish & Crawford Brewery, and Cork Airport.  He is a regular contributor to historical documentaries on television and radio, most prominently the highly-acclaimed and popular The Burning of Cork (2005). He as historical advisor on the award-winning film of the Irish revolution, The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2006), and Jimmy’s Hall (dir. Ken Loach), which tells the story of the  Leitrim communist Jim Gralton, deported from Ireland in 1933.

Email: d.odriscoll@ucc.ie

Finola Doyle-O’Neill

Finola Doyle-O’Neill

Dr Finola Doyle O’Neill contributes to the media history stream of the MA.  A broadcast historian she holds a Doctorate in Ireland’s radio and television  history and lectures in the area of Ireland’s broadcast and  film history. She is author of The Gaybo Revolution: How Gay Byrne Challenged Irish Society and she is a regular commentator on radio on issues relating to Ireland’s broadcasting history. Her recent contributions include comments on regulations pertaining to Ireland’s broadcasting laws for children and newspaper governance in Ireland.

Email: F.Doyle-ONeill@ucc.ie

Damian Bracken

Damian Bracken

Dr Damian Bracken contributes to the Medieval and Renaissance stream of the MA. His PhD, completed in 1994, examined Latin and Latin influenced elements of early Irish vernacular law, and my research has focused on Hiberno-Latin literature, especially on the works of St Columbanus, the earliest Irish writer to leave an identifiable corpus of writings, and the first to explore Irish identity. He is interested particularly in exploring Columbanus’s works in the context of late antique and early medieval ideals of authority and concepts of orthodoxy. He teaches in the School of History, UCC, and spent periods teaching in the Department of History, Boston University, and the in Department of History, Boston College, where he held the Brian P. Burns Chair in Irish Studies. He jointly editedIreland and Europe in the twelfth century: reform and renewal (Dublin 2006) and the commentary volume that accompanies the facsimile of the Schaffhausen Adomnán, recently published as the first volume in the series Irish Manuscripts in Facsimile.

Email: d.bracken@ucc.ie

Jason Harris

Jason Harris

Dr Jason Harris contributes to the Medieval and Renaissance stream of the MA.  A graduate of Trinity College Dublin, his PhD thesis focused on intellectual circles in northern-Europe during the second half of the sixteenth century, particularly on the friendship network of Abraham Ortelius.  Since 2008, he has been the Director of the Centre for Neo-Latin Studies, taking a lead role in fund-raising and project design for the Centre. In particular, this has led to the creation of the Ad Fontes project (on the earliest traces of humanism in Ireland), the Historia project (on the Capuchin missions to Ireland), and the Third Tongue project (on the use of Latin by Protestant writers in Ireland).  His research focuses on early-modern intellectual culture, particularly the use of Latin in this period, which he studies from a linguistic, stylistic and anthropological perspective. Much of his work has focused on Latin writers from northern Europe, especially from Ireland and the Low Countries. He is currently writing a monograph on stylistic aspects of humanist Latin, while preparing editions and translations of a range of different texts that have been the focus of his research projects in recent years.

Email: j.harris@ucc.ie