MA in History at University College Cork

Interrogate old and new ways of doing history.

MA in History at University College Cork

Investigate how history graduates contribute to numerous work environments.

MA in History at University College Cork

Critically appreciate the manipulation, uses and abuses of history.

MA in History at University College Cork

Examine the relationship between collective memory and identity and history.

The MA in History is an innovative addition to the taught programmes of the School of History at UCC.  It is a 12-month programme (24-months part-time).

It offers unique flexibility and diversity: choose your area of specialisation (Modern Ireland, Medieval and Renaissance History, Media and History, and International and European History) and between multiple modules. You select from diverse topics, themes and approaches such as revolution and regime change, collective memory and commemoration, cultural heritage, the medieval world view, Ireland’s relationships and encounters with the wider world, identity, nationalism, the evolution of healthcare, radicalism and social unrest, the historical uses and applications of modern media, war and peace, booms and busts since the dawn of modern finance, contemporary history, US foreign relations or feminist history. Take the opportunity to focus on political, economic, social, cultural, international or transnational history.

In addition, the MA in History provides the option of a work placement with a relevant host in the media, heritage, publishing business, private or public sectors to apply and enhance your skills. The thoughtful and inventive assessment mix will provoke and challenge you, and the internationally-respected faculty team will mentor you throughout the degree. Equip yourself with a sophisticated appreciation of history and its applications.

Features

WORK PLACEMENT

WORK PLACEMENT

An optional work placement to enhance the development of practical skills, practical learning and employability.

RESEARCH FOCUSED

RESEARCH FOCUSED

Strong emphasis placed on research, with an opportunity to specialise in a research dissertation of personal interest.

WIDE CHOICE

WIDE CHOICE

An appealing range of streams and module options.

EXPERT FACULTY

EXPERT FACULTY

All staff are internationally recognised experts in their field andn will mentor you throughout the degree.

PUBLIC HISTORY

PUBLIC HISTORY

A strong core Identity: the degree focuses on ways to make history public.

VARIED ASSESSMENT

VARIED ASSESSMENT

Learn through a variety of means including: long and short essays, literature reviews, proposals, blogs, web displays, radio archive analyses, treaty/document critiques, exhibitions, work placement portfolios, in-class assignments,  oral presentations, producing a radio documentary, group projects.

Programme Details

Part One (45 credits)

1. All students take 15 credits of the following compulsory modules:

  • Making History Public (10 credits)
  • Changing Directions in History: Transformative Historians and their Work (5 credits)

2. Students select 20 credits from one of the following streams:

Medieval and Renaissance History Modern Ireland Media History European and International History

3. Finally, students choose an additional 10 credits from any module on the MA that they have not already selected or they may take the following

  • HI6063 Work Placement and Portfolio (10 credits)

Part Two (45 credits)

  • HI6100 Dissertation (45 credits)

Students work closely with an academic supervisor to complete a 20,000 word minor dissertation on a topic of their choosing within the broad area of history. There will be a series of workshops to facilitate students in selecting, researching and writing their dissertations.

Modules

Click below to learn more about the modules that make up the MA programme.

  • All
  • Core Modules
  • European and International History
  • Media and History
  • Medieval and Renaissance History
  • Modern Ireland
HI6100 History Dissertation

HI6100 History Dissertation

45 credits. This involves training students in historical...
Detail
HI6090 The Insular World in Text and Image

HI6090 The Insular World in Text and Image

10 credits. This develops skills in the interpretation of...
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HI6089 Insular Encounters with the Wider World

HI6089 Insular Encounters with the Wider World

5 credits. The module examines actual and virtual Insular...
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HI6088 Historical Contexts for Medievalists

HI6088 Historical Contexts for Medievalists

5 credits. This introduces students to key research conte...
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HI6087 Healthcare in Ireland, 1750 – present

HI6087 Healthcare in Ireland, 1750 – present

10 credits. The module explains how modern healthcare in ...
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HI6086 Booms and Busts: Key Issues in International Finance since 1700

HI6086 Booms and Busts: Key Issues in International Finance since 1700

10 credits. This surveys the key developments in global f...
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HI6084 From Wireless to the World Wide Web: Radio as Historical Source

HI6084 From Wireless to the World Wide Web: Radio as Historical Source

10 credits This module explores the historical value of r...
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HI6083 Radicalism, Dissent and the Print Media in Modern Ireland

HI6083 Radicalism, Dissent and the Print Media in Modern Ireland

10 credits This explores the history of radicalism and di...
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HI6082 Female Activism and Feminism in Ireland, c. 1860-1985

HI6082 Female Activism and Feminism in Ireland, c. 1860-1985

10 credits This explores and evaluates the nature of fema...
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HI6081 History on Screen: Film, Television and History

HI6081 History on Screen: Film, Television and History

10 credits This explores the historical value of historic...
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HI6077 The Classical Revival 1250-1500

HI6077 The Classical Revival 1250-1500

10 credits The module examines the origins and developmen...
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HI6078 New Worlds, Ancient Texts

HI6078 New Worlds, Ancient Texts

10 credits This module examines the way in which ancient ...
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HI6076 Changing Directions in History: Transformative Historians and Their Work

HI6076 Changing Directions in History: Transformative Historians and Their Work

5 credits The module examines the principal changes in hi...
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HI6075 Making History Public

HI6075 Making History Public

10 credits. This explores the concept of Public History a...
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HI6074 Debates in the Irish Revolution

HI6074 Debates in the Irish Revolution

10 credits This module acquaints students with significan...
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HI6063 Work Placement and Portfolio

HI6063 Work Placement and Portfolio

10 credits. Students are provided with, or arrange, appro...
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HI6048 War and Peace: the European State System from 1648 to 1990

HI6048 War and Peace: the European State System from 1648 to 1990

10 credits This offers an analysis of the development of ...
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HI6026 US Foreign Policy and Contemporary History

HI6026 US Foreign Policy and Contemporary History

10 credits. This option will examine the history of conte...
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Coordinating Team

The MA draws on a wide range of expertise from across the School of History, but here are the people who coordinate each stream.

Mervyn O’Driscoll

Mervyn O’Driscoll

Dr Mervyn O’Driscoll is the programme coordinator for the MA in History and he is also responsible for the European and International and Modern Ireland streams. Mervyn has published on Irish foreign policy, European integration history, nuclear history and Cold War Anglo-French-American relations.   He has lectured throughout Ireland, the UK, Europe, China and the US. His various works cover the following fields: Irish foreign policy, Irish neutrality, British diplomacy, nuclear history and Irish-European relations.  He currently serves as Vice-Chair of the Royal Irish Academy’s Standing Committee for International Affairs and on the advisory committee for the Dictionary of Irish Biography.  His interests include Irish diplomacy and foreign relations (neutrality, relations with Europe including the EC/EU) , international history, independent Ireland (politics, anti-Semitism, minorities, modernisation), 20th century Britain, post-war France, modern Germany, military history and nuclear history.

Email: mervyn.odriscoll@ucc.ie

David Ryan

David Ryan

Professor David Ryan is responsible for the Public History strand of the MA. David has published extensively on contemporary history and US foreign policy concentrating on the US interventions in the post-Vietnam era, including Central America, Angola, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and the broader Middle East amongst other places.  Professor Ryan maintains an active engagement with a variety of professional associations and has acted as Vice-Chair of the Transatlantic Studies Association with membership from throughout Europe, the Americas and Australia.  He serves as Senior Associate Editor of the Association’s The Journal of Transatlantic Studies published by Routledge.   David also headed a major research project on War and American Identity.

Email: david.ryan@ucc.ie

Donal O’Drisceoil

Donal O’Drisceoil

Dr Donal O’Drisceoil contributes to the media stream of the programme.   Donal has published extensively on both Irish labour history and on the history of modern Irish media and literary censorship.  He has also published widely on the history of Cork, co-authoring acclaimed volumes on the English Market, Murphy’s Brewery, Beamish & Crawford Brewery, and Cork Airport.  He is a regular contributor to historical documentaries on television and radio, most prominently the highly-acclaimed and popular The Burning of Cork (2005). He as historical advisor on the award-winning film of the Irish revolution, The Wind that Shakes the Barley (2006), and Jimmy’s Hall (dir. Ken Loach), which tells the story of the  Leitrim communist Jim Gralton, deported from Ireland in 1933.

Email: d.odriscoll@ucc.ie

Finola Doyle-O’Neill

Finola Doyle-O’Neill

Dr Finola Doyle O’Neill contributes to the media history stream of the MA.  A broadcast historian she holds a Doctorate in Ireland’s radio and television  history and lectures in the area of Ireland’s broadcast and  film history. She is author of The Gaybo Revolution: How Gay Byrne Challenged Irish Society and she is a regular commentator on radio on issues relating to Ireland’s broadcasting history. Her recent contributions include comments on regulations pertaining to Ireland’s broadcasting laws for children and newspaper governance in Ireland.

Email: F.Doyle-ONeill@ucc.ie

Damian Bracken

Damian Bracken

Dr Damian Bracken contributes to the Medieval and Renaissance stream of the MA. His PhD, completed in 1994, examined Latin and Latin influenced elements of early Irish vernacular law, and my research has focused on Hiberno-Latin literature, especially on the works of St Columbanus, the earliest Irish writer to leave an identifiable corpus of writings, and the first to explore Irish identity. He is interested particularly in exploring Columbanus’s works in the context of late antique and early medieval ideals of authority and concepts of orthodoxy. He teaches in the School of History, UCC, and spent periods teaching in the Department of History, Boston University, and the in Department of History, Boston College, where he held the Brian P. Burns Chair in Irish Studies. He jointly editedIreland and Europe in the twelfth century: reform and renewal (Dublin 2006) and the commentary volume that accompanies the facsimile of the Schaffhausen Adomnán, recently published as the first volume in the series Irish Manuscripts in Facsimile.

Email: d.bracken@ucc.ie

Jason Harris

Jason Harris

Dr Jason Harris contributes to the Medieval and Renaissance stream of the MA.  A graduate of Trinity College Dublin, his PhD thesis focused on intellectual circles in northern-Europe during the second half of the sixteenth century, particularly on the friendship network of Abraham Ortelius.  Since 2008, he has been the Director of the Centre for Neo-Latin Studies, taking a lead role in fund-raising and project design for the Centre. In particular, this has led to the creation of the Ad Fontes project (on the earliest traces of humanism in Ireland), the Historia project (on the Capuchin missions to Ireland), and the Third Tongue project (on the use of Latin by Protestant writers in Ireland).  His research focuses on early-modern intellectual culture, particularly the use of Latin in this period, which he studies from a linguistic, stylistic and anthropological perspective. Much of his work has focused on Latin writers from northern Europe, especially from Ireland and the Low Countries. He is currently writing a monograph on stylistic aspects of humanist Latin, while preparing editions and translations of a range of different texts that have been the focus of his research projects in recent years.

Email: j.harris@ucc.ie

Entry Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MA in History programme, an applicant will normally possess a primary degree result of Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2H1) primary degree  (or equivalent) in History, or a cognate/suitable subject (normally in the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences or Law).  For North American students a cumulative GPA of 3.3 is normal.

Candidates who hold a primary degree in History or a cognate/suitable subject with a Second Class Honours Grade II (2H2) will also be considered (normally in the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences or Law), as will those with a GPA between 2.7 and 3.2. These applicants will be requested to provide additional information, documentation, samples of work and/or be interviewed by a Selection Committee.

In exceptional circumstances, professional experience in a relevant and related field (e.g. working in publishing, journalism, the heritage industry, archives etc.) may be accepted as compensating for the absence of an undergraduate degree  awarded at a grade lower than 2H2.  Admission of such applicants will be subject to the approval of the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Sciences.

All applicants whose first language is not English are required to sit either an IELTS test or a recognised equivalent test. The minimum requirement is an IELTS score of 6.5, with no individual section lower than 5.5. Further information on English language requirements can be found at http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

How to Apply

Application for this programme (CKE 44 full-time; CKD 24 part-time) is on-line at www.pac.ie/ucc. Places on this programme are offered in rounds. The closing dates for each round can be found here.

For full details of the application procedure click How to apply.

Please note you will be required to answer specific additional/supplementary questions as part of the online applications process for this programme. A copy of these additional/supplementary questions are available to view here.

The School of History may ask applicants to provide letters of reference when considering applications.

All other required supporting documentation (e.g. evidence of non-UCC undergraduate/postgraduate qualifications) must be UPLOADED via the PAC “Application Status” link or sent in hard copy to The Postgraduate Applications Centre, 1, Courthouse Square, Galway (marked with the applicants PAC application number)

Early applications are encouraged for early decisions.

Programme Coordinator - Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll

  • +353 21 490 3477
  • mervyn.odriscoll@ucc.ie
  • https://www.ucc.ie/en/history/
  • School of History
    University College Cork
    Cork
    Ireland